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At the center of Sandra Erbacher’s exhibition is an unsettling discovery found in an unlikely place. While flipping through the book Office Furniture from 1984 on adjustable desks and modular furniture, she found an image of men and women seated around a swastika-shaped desk. Erbacher, who was born and raised in Germany, was so disturbed and intrigued by the image that she did archival research to try to find its original use in product catalogues of the manufacturer, Krueger Wisconsin. Unable to find it or learn the designer’s intentions, the image is…

Despite an increase of U.S. citizens traveling to Cuba in the recent past, the popular American image of that island nation remains a combination of ‘50s cars and fine cigars, symbols of a discourse stuck on insularity and trade restrictions. Northampton, MA photographer Mark Guglielmo is more interested in how Cubans see themselves. Cubaneo, his exhibition of large-scale “photo-mosaics” on view through October 27 at Villa Victoria Center for the Arts’ La Galería in Boston, takes its title from a term used by Cubans to reference ways in which their contemporary identity…

“A book, or a work of art [culture] cannot by itself change the world, but by asking the questions that matter, it might attempt to be an act of articulation against violence, both the brutal and casual kinds. It might aspire to starting a conversation, through which together we might find common meaning and words that free.” -Jeff Chang For this digital artist residency with Big Red & Shiny I will produce a series of essays that explore different emotions I’ve been processing and trying to articulate visually in America’s Post-Obama Era.…

In a self-described “series of dubious choices” and “earnest efforts,” artists Emmy Bright and J.R. Uretsky have populated the Distillery Gallery’s space with vibrantly hued sculptures, colorful sand, and self-effacing text in their show Feeling Feeling. True to its title, the exhibition is a tangle of enervating emotions and self-deprecation. A bright mound of crocheted yarn greets the viewer on entering. At the top, a small television set peeks out through the bright strands, acting as the lone anatomical reference. A variety of faces flicker across its screen, some dazzled and others…

In her solo exhibition at Kingston Gallery, Fare Well: The Art of Ending, on view August 30 – October 1, Kathleen Gerdon Archer’s photographic work demonstrated a masterful ability to blend abstraction, process, and place. Gerdon Archer credits the inspiration for these photographs to rock formations left by receding glaciers that once covered New England. To create the final product, she collects various objects and freezes them, according to Kingston’s website, “layer by layer, to build a conglomerate [structure].” After these new arctic objects are created, she photographs them as they melt.…

Maria Molteni is a Boston-based artist who was a part of the Boston Artist in Residence program from 2016 – 2017. She is also the founder and team captain of the New Craft Artists in Action, a collective that looks at the intersections of art and sports with creative and social action. Her artistic practice and community presence are characterized by energy and color. Molteni works in creative expression across all media, and brings sports into this fold seamlessly through her chosen media, subjects, and collaborative focus on teamwork. How did this…

Corridors can be odd spaces in museums, heavily trafficked but not always experienced. Art mounted in these passages can feel like an afterthought. This was not the case with Caleb Cole’s Forget Me Not, recently on view at the Newport Art Museum. Occupying the hallway of the museum’s Griswold House, Cole’s work on gender, embodiment and, indeed, the idea of ‘passing’ as male, was especially fitting in this transitory space. The show, which ran from late May through July 30, concerned the “joy in queerness, transness, and femininity,” often manifesting with both…

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